Cat vaccinations

There are a number of serious feline diseases that can be fatal even with treatment. It is possible to give your cat protection against these diseases by having a planned vaccination schedule.

Diseases you need to vaccinate against

In cats, the primary diseases that are routinely vaccinated against are:

Enteritis (feline panleukopenia)
Causes severe intestinal ulceration and a decrease in the function of the immune system. Usually fatal.

Feline calici virus 
Part of the cat flu, causes sneezing, conjunctivitis and mouth ulcers.

Feline rhinotracheitis (feline herpes virus)
Part of the cat flu, causes sneezing, conjunctivitis, eye ulcers,  loss of appetite and can lead to permanent nasal and sinus infection.

Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV = feline AIDS)
If your cat EVER ventures outside (even if supervised) it is at risk of being infected by FIV. One in four cats in Victoria test positive for FIV infection. FIV is spread from cat to cat via bites. The virus leads to a failure of a cat’s immune system. Initial symptoms such as fever, sores and diarrhea eventually progress to long term infection. There is no treatment or cure for FIV.

Vaccination types

F3 vaccination: protects against feline calici virus, feline rhinotracheitis (feline herpes virus) and panleucopenia.

FIV vaccination: protects against feline AIDS.

Vaccination schedule

Vaccination schedule for indoor cats

Age Vaccination
6-8 weeks F3
10-12 weeks F3
Annually F3

Vaccination schedule for outdoor cats

Age Vaccination
8 weeks F3 + FIV
10 weeks FIV
12 weeks F3 + FIV
Annually F3 + FIV

Your kitten can go outside and socialise with other cats one week after the final kitten vaccination.

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